50+ tips on how to stretch your student loan

Discover how easy it is to cut the cost of everything from rent to commuting, with our big list of money-saving tips and tricks. A penny saved is a penny made!

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How to start saving

Whatever your means, there’s no need to fall into the cash-strapped, debt-ridden student stereotype. We’ve put together a student MoneySaving checklist with over 50 quick tips to help get you through university or college without a serious debt hangover. 

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Top money saving tips for student

 There’s no need to fall into the cash-strapped, debt-ridden student stereotype. We’ve put together  the best  student saving checklist with over 50 quick tips to help get you through university or college without a serious debt hangover. 

Your student loan is paid into your bank account in three instalments at the start of each term, so it might change your mind set and you might think you have loads of money to splash in your first weeks, but you haven’t. The student loan is main to last for the whole term. You have to be the boss of your money and control your spending

Note: Keep in mind, splashing money at Uni as a Fresher is a common problem and Students usually suffer from it throughout the whole term.

Graduates could potentially leave university with thousands of pounds of debt to pay back and no plan. It limits your saving ability as money coming in is eaten up by a negative balance if overdrawn. It might encourage laxness with finances and poor budgeting skills over the years of studying.

Before you go to uni, it’s a good idea to get a student bank account. Often banks charge hefty fees and interest for the privilege, but student account overdrafts are interest-free. Debt is never a good thing, but a student bank account overdraft is an excellent buffer to keep up your sleeve, in case of emergencies.

 

Always verify from the local authority of your area what benefits and discounts are available for student. Local authorities control council tax support. Each one decides what help to offer its residents.

General Tips to all students

Stay with other students; full-time student living alone or with other students you don’t need to pay council tax, it doesn’t matter how how are staying together.

Living with non-students; Council tax cost is based on two or more adults living together. Some people – like students, people on apprentice schemes and carers (see Gov.uk for a full list) people under this group are known as ‘disregarded people’, which means they’re entitled to a council tax discount, they are not considered as adults

More so, if a student lives with a non-student, the student is disregarded. It shall be considered as one adult, the council task will be reduced by 25%.

Live with more than one non-student? Here, while the student again is exempt, because there are two non-students the house has to pay the full 100% charge.

 

 

This very common and very important, If you don’t have enough cash, overborrow is a not a good practice (and especially don’t get a payday loan) – try to find a job instead.

see our Boost your income guide for some more unusual ideas that will help both part time and full time students and even post graduates

Do your research.

Be flexible.

Work for accommodation.

Stay cheap – or for free (without working)

Get a student discount card.

Take advantage of discounts on trains and buses.

Or try ridesharing.

Save with student-only flight discounts

 

One of the main ways that students are able to get a free 16-25 railcard is through student bank accounts. Many banks offer similar student accounts so try to differentiate themselves from other banks by offering a free railcard. One of the main banks to offer such a perk is Santander.

Cards can be bought from the Railcard website for £30 a year, or £70 for three years. So spend over £90 a year, even in just one trip, and you’ll save. You can get 10% off a one-year railcard if you’re registered with Student Beans.

 

Students with kids or disabilities are qualify for some special support. 

For more on what’s available and how to apply, see Gov.uk.

Commit yourself to doing it regularly. 

Minimize your tools. 

Minimize your pots and pans. 

Get out and measure all of your ingredients before you even start something. 

Get a cook book that teaches technique. 

Don’t tackle complicated stuff

Try to learn something each time you make something

right off the bat

Before you hit the shops, remember to check our Discount Vouchers page for a massive compendium of all the latest printable vouchers, codes and deals open to all.

If you regularly face a palpitation-inducing mobile phone bill, there’s a mass of tips ‘n’ tricks to help

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